Tag Archives: social media

5 Lessons for Social Media Marketing from Cricket (Yes, the Sport)

I was really excited to find a blog dedicated to social media and sports analogies. I have always been a cricket fan and even though I don’t watch all the games now, I still follow the updates.

This was originally published on that blog and if you are a sports fan you’ll find a lot of other interesting posts there.

I came across this blog a few weeks back and loved the idea of relating social media with sports. I don’t know how many of you follow or understand cricket but Brian agreed to publish this and I am hoping you will share your feedback in the comments. Even if you don’t like what I have here, do say ‘hi’ if you love Cricket or would like to learn more of it.

Comparing social media to a five-day long game of cricket seems a bit odd but that’s what I am going to do. There are so many similarities between the two that I had to limit myself to writing only from a batsman’s perspective. So here we go.

Social media is like test cricket
Originally uploaded to Flicker by fiverlocker

Continue reading 5 Lessons for Social Media Marketing from Cricket (Yes, the Sport)

Twitter Mistakes Small Businesses Can’t Afford to Make

Twitter is a tricky medium to get right, and many, many brands make a few simple mistakes.

Not Following Anyone (or Following Too Few People)

Twitter is a social medium. If you’re not following anyone, that tells me you’re not interested in listening, only talking. If you’re a big brand with tens (or hundreds) of thousands of followers, you can get away with this, but small businesses can’t.

Not Tweeting

Listening’s necessary, but why are you on Twitter if you’re not tweeting?

"Official Twitter account" @Philips has no tweets

Continue reading Twitter Mistakes Small Businesses Can’t Afford to Make

How Small Businesses Are Using Hashtags on Facebook

I’m not sure whether I’m more excited or wary about Facebook hashtags, but I do think it’s a game-changer. I took a look at how small businesses are using hashtags on Facebook, and what we can learn from them.

Don’t: overuse them.

Facebook post with a bunch of similar hashtags: #smallbiz, #smallbusiness, #business

We’ve seen this on Twitter all this while, and now it’s on Facebook: overuse of the hashtag. Don’t use a bunch of synonyms in your hashtags — just use one or two hashtags that might be most relevant.

Continue reading How Small Businesses Are Using Hashtags on Facebook

Monday Marketing Mash-Up: Social Media News You Should Know

Social media changes: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter
They’re all beginning to look the same

Looks like all social media sites are making tons of changes. Here are some recent changes that affect small businesses.

Facebook has removed a number of features, including sponsored stories — which is great, because we’re all tired of those sponsored “your friend likes this page” updates. But I’m sad that they’re killing questions (though why not call them polls, Facebook)?

Here’s the announcement by Facebook and a nice explanatory post on HubSpot. What does this mean for businesses? Now you can’t waste money promoting what someone did on/to your page or content.

The other big Facebook change is the introduction of hashtags: this could really change the game for Facebook, by making search and discovery much easier. Marketers, start optimizing your Facebook posts!

Twitter’s adding analytics. This is really cool, but no idea when this will be rolled out to all users. For businesses, this is will help to see what tweets are working and whether you’re just wasting your time (even if you’re not using Markitty).

Twitter has started 2-step log-in verification, and so has LinkedIn.

Speaking of LinkedIn, you can now share media files in your updates, so start sharing those photos and presentations. LinkedIn also previously added the ability to add visual content to your profile (or page). 

With these updates and having added the ability to tag people, LinkedIn’s begun to look eerily like Facebook and Google Plus. And Facebook’s trying to be more like Twitter, earlier with timelines and now hashtags. Which begs the question: if they’re all the same, should we bother trying to be present on all of them or just focus on one? Or maybe automated cross-posting is the answer (please, no).

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Using Markitty: Daily Tips and Insights on Your “Today” Page

The daily recommendations are the most important part of Markitty. Your Markitty home page tells you exactly what you should be doing today.

We just redesigned the page to make this more obvious (and pretty). The Home page is now the Today page: as in, your things to do today.

This is how it looks.

Online marketing recommendations and tips

Continue reading Using Markitty: Daily Tips and Insights on Your “Today” Page

Closing The Loop: Merging Online And Offline Marketing

You probably have a Facebook page for your business if you are a restaurant or an established retail business. How do you promote your page? How do you reach out to the same people online who are already coming to your physical store?

Most businesses rely on their customers (or prospects) to find them online and like their Facebook page or follow them on Twitter. But why not actively close this loop? Let’s look at examples of some businesses in Pune who are doing this.

1. apniChai asking their customers to like them on Facebook

apniChai is on Facebook

Continue reading Closing The Loop: Merging Online And Offline Marketing

Are Facebook Pages Worthless or Are You Doing Social Wrong?

Often, we tell business-owners that just because someone liked your Facebook page doesn’t mean your posts show up in their news feed. Usually, they are shocked to know this. This blogger on Forbes found out the hard way:

Once we started posting on our Facebook page, we were shocked, shocked, to see that not all the users that liked our page were seeing our posts. For example, with over 6,000 likes on our page, a typical post would only be seen by fifty to several hundred people. To reiterate, only 1% to 5% of the people that liked our page saw our posts.

But does this mean Facebook pages are a bad investment for small businesses, as the title of that post says? No.  Continue reading Are Facebook Pages Worthless or Are You Doing Social Wrong?

Monday Marketing Mash-up: Only Some of Your Facebook Fans See Some of Your Posts

Many business-owners we talk to don’t know that not everyone who likes their Facebook page sees all (or even any) of their posts. So this week’s links will tell you how this works.

First of all, you need to know about something called EdgeRank. From TechCrunch:

Facebook’s news feed ranking algorithm (widely known as EdgeRank) chooses between hundreds or thousands of pieces of content each day to show the few dozen most relevant stories in each person’s news feed.

Facebook told me in February that the average Page reaches 16 percent of its fans with each post. That’s because some fans aren’t online when the post is published, a specific post hasn’t gotten much engagement from the people Facebook already showed it to, and because if you don’t interact with that Page when you do see its posts, Facebook will only show you them every once in awhile.

In February last year, it might have been true that a post on an average page is shown to 16 percent of fans. It seems to have gone down significantly since then, to 10% or even less.

Here’s an explanation of how Facebook’s EdgeRank algorithm works. It’s based on three variables: Affinity (your fan’s history of interacting with your content), Time Decay (newer posts are more likely to show up), and Weight (what kind of posts do your fans interact with  more — in general, as opposed to Affinity, which is for particular fans. Confusing, I know.)

Basically, the more fans engage with your content, the more likely your content is shown to them. This infographic explains more.

How do you increase the reach of your content? Mashable has some (obvious) tips.

Also on Mashable are these more interesting and actionable tips. This article is from 2011, but these should still work!

The short version: focus on engaging your fans. For Facebook, reach –> engagement/interaction –> more reach.

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Weekly Reading: Trackbacks and Data Hub Activity on Google Analytics

We have been talking a lot about Google Analytics lately. Do you know of the new Google Analytics reports that show trackbacks and links from social media more explicitly? You should, so read this week’s links for details.

But first, how do you get to these reports? On your Google Analytics sidebar on the left, go to Traffic Sources, and then Social. You’ll see the links for Data Hub Activity and Trackbacks.

Here’s a screenshot of our Trackbacks report. It shows us who linked to our site recently.

Google Analytics Trackbacks for Markitty

Continue reading Weekly Reading: Trackbacks and Data Hub Activity on Google Analytics

Weekly Reading: The Power of Focus

Marketing FunnelWe talk often about the power of focus here on the Markitty blog and in person. This blog post explains better than I ever could why this is even more important for small businesses.

If you want 1% of a market, you need to get everyone in that market to at least visit your website.

This ties in with the marketing funnel in our “measuring marketing” presentation. Start from the number of customers you want to meet your revenue targets and work backwards to the number of prospects you need to reach out to. You might be surprised.

Continue reading Weekly Reading: The Power of Focus

Using Markitty: Compare Tweets with Retweets and Mentions, and Your Followers to People You’re Following

Twitter offers users no stats at all, unlike most other social media sites. You can look at your followers and your total number of tweets from your home page (timeline), and click on the @ Connect button for recent retweets and mentions. But that’s it: you can’t see whether your follower count has increased from last week or last month (unless you’re using a separate method of keeping track); you have to count to see how many tweets you posted yesterday.

 Markitty’s Tweet Performance and Profile Performance graphs give you a quick glance at all of these for the last three weeks. The Tweet Performance graph compares your tweets each day with retweets you got and mentions of you by others.

Why compare tweets with retweets and mentions? Because common sense suggests that the more you tweet the more your mentions and retweets should increase (though not necessarily in the same day). If this isn’t happening, maybe you should look at the quality or relevance of your tweets.

Continue reading Using Markitty: Compare Tweets with Retweets and Mentions, and Your Followers to People You’re Following

Marketing Reading for the Week: New Social Media Features You Should Use

We’re moving the weekly round-up to Monday, so you can read it as you start your week. This week, here are some social media updates you should know of.

Did you know that you can now tag (mention) people on LinkedIn the way you do on Facebook or Twitter? I’m so glad they finally rolled this out. Even Google Plus had this!

Facebook changed their guidelines to remove restrictions on using calls to action or contact info on cover photos. Now you can say “Buy Now”, “Like”, or “Call us!” in your cover photo if you want to.

Facebook also introduced threading of comments, so that replies are bunched together. In itself, this is a great idea, but people are complaining about the replies being ordered by popularity/relevance instead of in chronological order. If you are a Page owner, this might make your life a little more difficult.

Facebook announced changes to the news feed last month, which are being rolled out to users. This article gives you the five coolest changes: I especially like that mobile usability will improve and we’ll see more content in chronological order.

On to Twitter: the new Twitter cards (that allow you to add rich content in a tweet) have interesting features. For developers, the app card looks really cool. The Gallery card lets you include up to four images in the same tweet. Most interestingly for e-commerce businesses, you can embed product details right inside a tweet.

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Don’t Get Cited on the Condescending Brand Corporate Page

Have you seen the Condescending Brand Corporate Page on Facebook? I’d call them a service to humanity: they highlight annoying, irrelevant posts by brands on social media and give you a range of examples on what not to do.

It’s a parody of many brands on Facebook. As their “About” page says:

Welcome to our Facebook page! We’ll be posting up plenty of engaging content to hopefully steal you away from your daytime chores and daily viewing of the Jeremy Kyle Show. We’ll also be asking some very open-ended questions that even a Chimp would find condescendingly offensive

Let’s look at a couple of recent posts.

Continue reading Don’t Get Cited on the Condescending Brand Corporate Page

Marketing Reading for the Weekend: Social Media Metrics You Can’t Ignore

Is it only a week since I last did this? It’s been Technology Breakdown Week here at Markitty, with laptops, ACs (okay, one AC), and power all refusing to cooperate. But we survived!

This post is a great quick look at five social media metrics and how you can monitor them.

On the Buffer blog, read about five essential social media metrics and how you can improve them.

Jay Baer claims that social referrals to your website is the most overrated social media metric. Most overrated is probably hyperbole (I think that distinction belongs to the number of Likes on your Facebook Page), but as we said on Twitter:

Continue reading Marketing Reading for the Weekend: Social Media Metrics You Can’t Ignore

Using Markitty: Compare Website Visits, Referrals, and Social Referrals

I’m going to show you some useful Markitty graphs, stats, and features, and explain why we put them in and how you can use them. For the very first in this series, I’ve picked this graph displaying data from Google Analytics.

Markitty graph screenshot: website visits, referrals, and social referrals

As the graph title says, this line graph shows you the total visits to your website, the number of visits that were referred by other sites, and the number of visits referred by social sites. You get all of these for the last three weeks (if you signed up with Markitty over three weeks ago).

Why did we put this graph together?

Continue reading Using Markitty: Compare Website Visits, Referrals, and Social Referrals

Markitty Software Update: More Graphs, More Tables, More Recommendations

Markitty: Software UpdateWe just released an update to Markitty with several significant (and a few not-such-a-big-deal changes). We’ve focused on adding more stats and recommendations that you can use to make marketing decisions. We have tried to format tables consistently throughout the site, and made some UI changes that we’re pretty excited about.

We’ve also added a Help page that should answer some of your questions and explain the data we show you. When you’re signed in to Markitty, the “Help” link is on the top right of the menu bar.

On to the details.

Continue reading Markitty Software Update: More Graphs, More Tables, More Recommendations

5 Reasons I Like Buffer (the Company)

Buffer is one of my favorite tools, but it’s not just the application itself I like, it’s the company. So well, let me count the ways.

Simple App That Focuses on One Benefit

I love how simple and easy Buffer is to use (in fact, I liked the earlier interface even better, because it was more simple). I’ve tried a few social media scheduling tools, but this is the only one I stuck with.

Tweets scheduled on Buffer

One click on the text box, type in or paste your tweet, and you’re done.

Continue reading 5 Reasons I Like Buffer (the Company)

Weekend Reads for Better Marketing: Sales and SEO

Little girl with make-up and rollers
This is about how fake I feel if I try to sell

Vijay Anand, the founder of the Startup Center and a well-known name in the Indian startup space, answers the question, “What will it take to build 1.000 Startups in a year?”

Tech columnist Farhad Manjoo writes about Facebook’s Graph Search (which Nilesh wrote about here).

You’ll immediately notice Facebook search’s amazing user interface and flexibility. You’ll also spot one glaring problem: The search results aren’t that good.

After just a few queries, I started asking the engine for more and more complicated things, just to see if it could keep up… It didn’t have any trouble.

I can’t wait to try it myself, though apparently Facebook is rolling it out “very slowly.”

Are you making these 9 mistakes on LinkedIn?

Continue reading Weekend Reads for Better Marketing: Sales and SEO