Monthly Archives: April 2013

Using Markitty: Compare Tweets with Retweets and Mentions, and Your Followers to People You’re Following

Twitter offers users no stats at all, unlike most other social media sites. You can look at your followers and your total number of tweets from your home page (timeline), and click on the @ Connect button for recent retweets and mentions. But that’s it: you can’t see whether your follower count has increased from last week or last month (unless you’re using a separate method of keeping track); you have to count to see how many tweets you posted yesterday.

 Markitty’s Tweet Performance and Profile Performance graphs give you a quick glance at all of these for the last three weeks. The Tweet Performance graph compares your tweets each day with retweets you got and mentions of you by others.

Why compare tweets with retweets and mentions? Because common sense suggests that the more you tweet the more your mentions and retweets should increase (though not necessarily in the same day). If this isn’t happening, maybe you should look at the quality or relevance of your tweets.

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Marketing Reading for the Week: New Social Media Features You Should Use

We’re moving the weekly round-up to Monday, so you can read it as you start your week. This week, here are some social media updates you should know of.

Did you know that you can now tag (mention) people on LinkedIn the way you do on Facebook or Twitter? I’m so glad they finally rolled this out. Even Google Plus had this!

Facebook changed their guidelines to remove restrictions on using calls to action or contact info on cover photos. Now you can say “Buy Now”, “Like”, or “Call us!” in your cover photo if you want to.

Facebook also introduced threading of comments, so that replies are bunched together. In itself, this is a great idea, but people are complaining about the replies being ordered by popularity/relevance instead of in chronological order. If you are a Page owner, this might make your life a little more difficult.

Facebook announced changes to the news feed last month, which are being rolled out to users. This article gives you the five coolest changes: I especially like that mobile usability will improve and we’ll see more content in chronological order.

On to Twitter: the new Twitter cards (that allow you to add rich content in a tweet) have interesting features. For developers, the app card looks really cool. The Gallery card lets you include up to four images in the same tweet. Most interestingly for e-commerce businesses, you can embed product details right inside a tweet.

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Don’t Get Cited on the Condescending Brand Corporate Page

Have you seen the Condescending Brand Corporate Page on Facebook? I’d call them a service to humanity: they highlight annoying, irrelevant posts by brands on social media and give you a range of examples on what not to do.

It’s a parody of many brands on Facebook. As their “About” page says:

Welcome to our Facebook page! We’ll be posting up plenty of engaging content to hopefully steal you away from your daytime chores and daily viewing of the Jeremy Kyle Show. We’ll also be asking some very open-ended questions that even a Chimp would find condescendingly offensive

Let’s look at a couple of recent posts.

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Using Markitty: View Your Top Facebook Posts for the Month

What are your top posts on Facebook this month?

With this table, we give you your top posts for the current month ordered by highest number of impressions (reach, in Facebook terms). So at a glance, you can see which of your posts this month were seen by the most people. You can click on the blue Previous Month button on the top right and see the same data for the last month as well.

Top Facebook posts table on Markitty

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Presentation: Interpreting Marketing Data

On April 20th, we conducted the third and the last session of our marketing workshop for start-ups and small businesses in Pune.

We talked about how to interpret online marketing results and make better business decisions by understanding the impact of various marketing activities on your data. Looking at a single metric like site visits or Facebook likes could lead you to make wrong inferences, which we demonstrated with a small case study.

Here is the presentation from the workshop for those who could not attend.

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Marketing Reading for the Weekend: Social Media Metrics You Can’t Ignore

Is it only a week since I last did this? It’s been Technology Breakdown Week here at Markitty, with laptops, ACs (okay, one AC), and power all refusing to cooperate. But we survived!

This post is a great quick look at five social media metrics and how you can monitor them.

On the Buffer blog, read about five essential social media metrics and how you can improve them.

Jay Baer claims that social referrals to your website is the most overrated social media metric. Most overrated is probably hyperbole (I think that distinction belongs to the number of Likes on your Facebook Page), but as we said on Twitter:

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Using Markitty: Compare Website Visits, Referrals, and Social Referrals

I’m going to show you some useful Markitty graphs, stats, and features, and explain why we put them in and how you can use them. For the very first in this series, I’ve picked this graph displaying data from Google Analytics.

Markitty graph screenshot: website visits, referrals, and social referrals

As the graph title says, this line graph shows you the total visits to your website, the number of visits that were referred by other sites, and the number of visits referred by social sites. You get all of these for the last three weeks (if you signed up with Markitty over three weeks ago).

Why did we put this graph together?

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Marketing Reading for the Weekend: Productivity and Procrastination

Stop procrastinating, get productiveAre you ready to start your weekend? Are you taking a long weekend with Gudi Padwa or Bihu or whatever it is you celebrate? (We are, though the holiday is a coincidence — we had planned for a three-day weekend weeks ago, and had been drooling when we thought of it.)

Anyway. While you’re relaxing over the weekend, or as you get back to work on Monday, read these articles on productivity and procrastination, so that you can have a super-charged week. (Or year, if you remember the advice long enough.)

Etienne Garbugli puts together time management tips in this presentation. I especially love these:

Work is the best way to get working. Start with short tasks to get the ball rolling.

Switching between clients/projects is unproductive.

Always know the one thing you really need to get done during the day.

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Improving Marketing: Session 3 of Online Marketing Workshop with POCC

The last of our three-session online marketing workshop with Pune OpenCoffee Club is on April 20. In this one, we will focus on using online marketing data to inform your business decisions. It will be an interactive session in which participants will share real-life challenges and the group will discuss solutions.

Group Discussion in Online Marketing Workshop
One of the groups in the last workshop in an energetic discussion

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Markitty Software Update: More Graphs, More Tables, More Recommendations

Markitty: Software UpdateWe just released an update to Markitty with several significant (and a few not-such-a-big-deal changes). We’ve focused on adding more stats and recommendations that you can use to make marketing decisions. We have tried to format tables consistently throughout the site, and made some UI changes that we’re pretty excited about.

We’ve also added a Help page that should answer some of your questions and explain the data we show you. When you’re signed in to Markitty, the “Help” link is on the top right of the menu bar.

On to the details.

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Weekend Reads for Better Marketing: Advice for Startups

Woman jumping in airThis weekend’s links are all about starting startups and working in startups.

If you’re just starting out, Daniel Tenner has advice for you. It’s awesome advice — even if you don’t agree or decide to ignore it anyway, read it.

Leo Widrich offers ten myths about startups. I found #1 particularly eye-opening: but it makes sense that deadlines don’t work “when you’re trying to do something innovative and new; when you don’t have a manual to refer to on how to perform your tasks.”

Rob Heaton tells you to check that you’re wearing trousers first, that is, try simple solutions firstThis paragraph is key:

It’s a pleasant delusion to believe that all our problems require hard solutions. This way we feel interesting, get to do challenging things and become more attractive to members of our preferred sex. If you’re constantly feeling tired it’s tempting to become concerned about your iron levels, consider painting your ceiling a relaxing shade of ochre and look into buying a new pillow that fits your personality better. But you probably just need to go to bed a bit earlier. Perhaps on some level of consciousness we find it hard to believe that anything simple could possibly make a dent in our problems, which as we already know are of course really difficult and can only be solved by a super-genius such as ourselves. But there will always be simple things you are doing badly that you should look at first, especially in a startup where you deliberately ignore 90% of things so that you can do the other 10% really, really right.

Joel Gascoigne’s thoughts on building a minimum viable product (MVP) also made me sit up and think, especially as that’s in line with what we’re trying to do with Markitty.

Speaking of Markitty, if you haven’t yet read Nilesh’s account of our journey so far, do it now.

The Markitty Story: in the Hustler’s Words

Unmana wrote about how we decided to get started with Markitty: here is my account of the product development so far.

Gathering courage

I had done a bit of coding more than 10 years back, but since then my exposure to the technical side was limited to managing software projects, data analysis, and occasional experiments with SQL or Excel macros. Building a SaaS product of our own was a task I had never imagined taking up.

Outsource or build in-house

We didn’t have a lot of money to hire a great outsourcing vendor or to hire a senior technical lead. We did try looking for someone who could be a technical co-founder but that was not going to be easy.

Unmana and I had both worked in geographically distributed teams for a long time and understood the communication overheads and leakages that need to be dealt with in such a setup. So we were very clear from the beginning that we wanted to have a local team and dedicated developers who can work closely with us. Apart from the cost, culture was the biggest driver behind this decision.

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